Memory Functions and Learning Modalities

 

Memory Functions

and

Learning Modalities

Clip art, brain with key.

 

 

 

 


  • Auditory Memory: Auditory memory is the ability to remember information presented orally.1

  • Auditory Sequential Memory: Auditory sequential memory is the ability to remember a sequence of information presented orally (a series of sounds within a word, a series of words within a sentence, a series of ideas within a story.)1

  • Visual Memory: Visual memory is the ability to remember information presented visually.1

  • Visual Sequential Memory: Visual sequential memory is the ability to remember visual information presented in a sequence.1

  • Auditory-Visual Associative Memory: Auditory-visual associative memory is the ability to remember verbal and visual information presented simultaneously (sounds associated with letters).1

Remembering information in long-term memory can
be facilitated by verbal and physical activity and by
the usage of objects that can be seen and handled.
 


We learn through all senses, but generally favor one. Learning modalities are affected by memory disorders. For example a person with a visual memory disorder will have difficulty remembering information that is presented only in a visual way. That person will more easily retain the information if it is presented using auditory, kinesthetic or tactile modes. Educators have to prepare lessons that will meet all the core modalities. In a classroom students with or without memory problems learn best in different ways.

1 Dornbush, Marilyn and Pruit, Sheryl. ( 1993) Teaching the Tiger. Duarte, Ca, Hope Press, 143 - 144.


Site maintained by Diana T. Mackiewicz, Ma.Ed.
Last updated June 2005.